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Fifty-one percent (51%) of Florida’s Likely Voters say they are better off than they were four years ago. A PoliticalIQ.com survey found that 41% are not and 8% are not sure.

As on most things in the political world these days, there is a strong partisan divide. Seventy-two percent (72%) of Republicans say they are better off while 62% of Democrats say they are not. Among Independent voters, 49% are better off and 41% are not.

Most men think they are better off while women are more evenly divided. That is a fairly typical gender gap. On just about all issues related to economics, men are more optimistic than women.

In a normal year, the fact that a majority of Florida voters believe they are better off would be good news for the incumbent. However, the survey found that while most Floridians are better off personally, just 40% believe the country is better off than it was four years ago. Fifty-two percent (52%) take the opposite view. Among those who are better off but believe the country isn’t, most are planning to vote for Joe Biden.

Data released earlier shows that former Vice President Joe Biden narrowly leads President Donald Trump in the race for Florida’s 29 Electoral Votes. However, the race is close enough that a strong Republican turnout could lead to a victory for the president.

Additional data from the Florida survey will be released soon on the Supreme Court confirmation battle, the pandemic, and other topics.

Methodology

The survey of 800 Likely Florida Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen from October 4-8, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Respondents were randomly selected from a list of Registered Voters and contacted via text or through a process of Random Digital Engagement. The Likely Voter sample was derived from a larger sample of Registered Voters using screening questions and other factors. Certain quotas were applied to the larger sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.