Kyiv

December 14, 2022

Mayor Klitschko reports blasts in a central district of Ukraine's capital and air defences are activated.

October 17, 2022

Russian-launched "kamikaze drones" attacked Kyiv early Monday, the Ukrainian presidency said, describing the strikes as an act of desperation nearly eight months into a war that has claimed thousands of lives.Air raid sirens sounded in Kyiv shortly before the first explosion at around 6:35 am (0335), followed by sirens across most of the country."The capital was attacked by kamikaze drones," the president's chief of staff Andriy Yermak said on social media."The Russians think it will help them, but it shows their desperation," he added."We need more air defense systems and as soon as possible. More weapons to defend the sky and destroy the enemy."The attacks come exactly a week after Russia unleashed a massive wave of missile strikes on the Ukrainian capital and cities across the country.Kyiv mayor Vitali Klitschko said the drone attack had caused a fire and damaged several buildings in the central Shevchenkivsky district and warned residents to take shelter."Fire departments are working. Several residential buildings were damaged. Medics are on the spot," he said on Telegram."We are clarifying the information about the casualties."The mayor also posted a picture of what he said was the charred wreckage of one of the kamikaze drones, loitering munitions that can hover while waiting for a target to attack.'Iranian drones'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky last week said Iranian drones were used in Russian attacks on energy infrastructure in several Ukrainian cities, although Tehran denies supplying Russia with weapons for the war.On October 10, Russian missiles rained down on Kyiv and other cities in the biggest wave of strikes in months.The attacks killed at least 19 people, wounded 105 others and sparked an international outcry.Moscow carried out further strikes on October 11, though on a smaller scale, striking energy installations in western Ukraine far from the front.Russian President Vladimir Putin said the strikes were in retaliation for an explosion that damaged a key bridge linking Russia to the Moscow-annexed Crimean peninsula.Putin on Friday had expressed satisfaction and said there was no need for further massive strikes on Ukraine "for now".The Russian president also claimed Moscow was "doing everything right" in its nearly eight-month invasion of Ukraine despite a string of embarrassing defeats.In southern Ukraine, Kyiv's troops have been pushing closer and closer to Kherson, the main city in the region of the same name just north of Crimea.Kherson is one of four regions in Ukraine that Moscow recently claimed to have annexed, and the city of Kherson was the first major city to fall after the Kremlin launched its invasion.Washington on Friday announced fresh military assistance for Kyiv "in the wake of Russia's brutal missile attacks on civilians across Ukraine".The new $725 million package included more ammunition for the Himars rocket systems that have been used by Ukraine to wreak havoc on Russian targets.It brings the total US military assistance to Ukraine to $17.6 billion since the Russian invasion on February 24.© 2022 AFP

August 17, 2022

Ukrainian special forces blew up an ammunition depot in Russian-occupied Crimea on Tuesday and may have been responsible for contemporaneous attacks on an air base and transformer substation, Ukrainian officials told The New York Times and The Washington Post.  Ukraine's government has not claimed credit for Tuesday's massive explosions in Crimea or last week's blasts at a different Russian air base that destroyed several Russian warplanes. But Ukrainian officials have publicly suggested that these were Ukrainian attacks — a president adviser coyly referred to the blasts as "demilitarization in action" — and Russia's defense ministry called Tuesday's explosions near the Crimean village of Mayskoye an "act of sabotage," conceding that Moscow's war in Ukraine has spread to areas recently believed to be out of harm's way. The attacks on Crimea, "transformed by eight years of occupation into a fortress," are a profound embarrassment to Russian President Vladimir Putin, whose near-bloodless seizure of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 was wildly popular in Russia and "cemented his image as a leader resurrecting Russia as a great power," the Times reports. "Until this month, Crimea appeared well protected from Ukrainian attacks," and Russians were flocking to its beaches. But war observers also say the strikes on Crimea are degrading Russia's ability to fend off Ukraine's telegraphed counteroffensive in Kherson, the strategically important coastal region north of the Crimean peninsula. "Russian supply lines from Crimea directly support Russian forces in mainland Ukraine including those in western Kherson Oblast," the U.S.-based Institute for the Study of War (ISW) think tank assessed on Tuesday. "Russia's possibilities on the battlefield are being limited" by Ukraine's strikes in Crimea, independent Russian military analyst Pavel Luzin tells the Times. "Crimea is the only way to support the grouping of troops in the Kherson and Zaporizka regions. Otherwise, this grouping of troops does not exist." The "attacks on Russian positions in and around Crimea are likely part of a coherent Ukrainian counteroffensive to regain control" of Kherson city, ISW's analysts write. "Ukraine's targeting of Russian ground lines of communication and logistic and support assets in Crimea is consistent with the Ukrainian counteroffensive effort that has also targeted bridges over the Dnipro River and Russian logistical support elements in occupied Kherson Oblast." "Ukraine lacks the heavy weaponry" to take Kherson by force right now, Mykola Bielieskov, a research fellow at Ukraine's National Institute for Strategic Studies, tells Politico. But forcing Moscow to redeploy forces to Kherson, now vulnerable to supply line cutoffs and Ukrainian artillery strikes, is "quite an achievement."

August 17, 2022

Ukrainian special forces blew up an ammunition depot in Russian-occupied Crimea on Tuesday and may have been responsible for contemporaneous attacks on an air base and transformer substation, Ukrainian officials told The New York Times and The Washington Post.  Ukraine's government has not claimed credit for Tuesday's massive explosions in Crimea or last week's blasts at a different Russian air base that destroyed several Russian warplanes. But Ukrainian officials have publicly suggested that these were Ukrainian attacks — a president adviser coyly referred to the blasts as "demilitarization in action" — and Russia's defense ministry called Tuesday's explosions near the Crimean village of Mayskoye an "act of sabotage," conceding that Moscow's war in Ukraine has spread to areas recently believed to be out of harm's way. The attacks on Crimea, "transformed by eight years of occupation into a fortress," are a profound embarrassment to Russian President Vladimir Putin, whose near-bloodless seizure of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 was wildly popular in Russia and "cemented his image as a leader resurrecting Russia as a great power," the Times reports. "Until this month, Crimea appeared well protected from Ukrainian attacks," and Russians were flocking to its beaches. But war observers also say the strikes on Crimea are degrading Russia's ability to fend off Ukraine's telegraphed counteroffensive in Kherson, the strategically important coastal region north of the Crimean peninsula. "Russian supply lines from Crimea directly support Russian forces in mainland Ukraine including those in western Kherson Oblast," the U.S.-based Institute for the Study of War (ISW) think tank assessed on Tuesday. "Russia's possibilities on the battlefield are being limited" by Ukraine's strikes in Crimea, independent Russian military analyst Pavel Luzin tells the Times. "Crimea is the only way to support the grouping of troops in the Kherson and Zaporizka regions. Otherwise, this grouping of troops does not exist." The "attacks on Russian positions in and around Crimea are likely part of a coherent Ukrainian counteroffensive to regain control" of Kherson city, ISW's analysts write. "Ukraine's targeting of Russian ground lines of communication and logistic and support assets in Crimea is consistent with the Ukrainian counteroffensive effort that has also targeted bridges over the Dnipro River and Russian logistical support elements in occupied Kherson Oblast." "Ukraine lacks the heavy weaponry" to take Kherson by force right now, Mykola Bielieskov, a research fellow at Ukraine's National Institute for Strategic Studies, tells Politico. But forcing Moscow to redeploy forces to Kherson, now vulnerable to supply line cutoffs and Ukrainian artillery strikes, is "quite an achievement."

Related

Newsletter

Get the featured stories in your email and don't miss out on important news.